Manett

Spring has sprung (My Friend Wallis - Be Free)

21 hours ago #my friend wallis #crystal dorval
theoceaniswonderful:

Coron Bay (46) by Jannik Pedersen

theoceaniswonderful:

Coron Bay (46) by Jannik Pedersen

1 day agotheoceaniswonderful 102 notes

I’m so tired of guru-speak, that banal way we all casually frame X,Y, or Z as leading to something bigger, better, grander. It infects talk of travel, school, and work of course. But also chitchat about TV, toiletries, and all other sundries tediously trite and only vaguely true.

I’m taut with tightness. Mum with madness. I want to decay once in a while. And growl at the food heaped so generously on your plate because it’s not on my plate.

Fuck belligerently.

Here is my self-help advice: When you take a shit, let it be a grand shit.

2 days ago 2 notes#self-help #poem

Eliane Radigue. From the late 1960’s until 2000 she created her work exclusively on a single synthesizer (ARP 2500) and tape.

2 days agobbookcomparator 296 notes
Shae Detar painted photography

Shae Detar painted photography

3 days ago
Shae Detar painted photography

Shae Detar painted photography

3 days ago

Oh, ma-mama, mo-ma, mo-ma mother
I would love to love you, lover
City is restless, it’s ready to pounce
Here in your bedroom, ounce for ounce

3 days ago

The B-52’s - Mesopotamia

3 days ago

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume from “The Wooden Prince”

Philip Prowse

1981

The Wooden Prince, a dancing-play in one act, was inspired by Bartók’s interest in folk music and folk lore. The wooden prince of the title is a model, created by a human prince to attract the attention of a princess, but a malignant fairy, wishing to keep them apart, brings it to life and the princess falls in love with it. Fortunately the fairy takes pity on the prince and, in true fairy-tale manner, all ends happily with the lovers reunited.

The production was influenced by the Chinese Peking opera, a theatrical form in which stories are told through movement, singing and complex, often highly acrobatic, movements. The costumes convey character and roles to the audience - thus the wavy patterns on the Fairy’s costume are associated with power while the attached flags at the back signify hard kao armour, and the ‘armour’ is also indicated by the overlapping scales on the breastplate of the costume.

The costume is superbly authoritative, not just in scale, with its large headdress and wide skirt, but in colour, using bold, primary blue and red with black and metallic fabrics. The variety of fabrics breaks up the surface - black floral Lurex, silver woven with tiny silver floral pattern, areas of blue overlaid with waves of black braids, and subtle touches of deep red. Given the costume, the role was somewhat static, but the impression of movement was conveyed by the black braid waves and by the lighter fabric used for the flags, which streamed out behide the dancer or moved subtly when she was still. The front panels are covered with individually applied ‘scales’, executed in several different black and gold Lurexes, interspersed with the silver floral brocade, which also ‘move’ as they catch the light. Despite the complexity of the design, the costume never feels fussy; the decoration is so controlled that all the elements are clearly defined. 

Prowse was a brilliantly inventive designer, and the appliqué panels and use of different materials to divide up a surface are characteristic of his work. Although he usually designed for the intimate space of Glasgow’s Citizens’ Theatre on very small budgets, he was equally capable of working on a large scale in opera houses, and this costume would have registered clearly in the vast spaces of the London Coliseum, where the ballet was performed. Its scale and colour ‘spotlit’ the character of the Fairy, and established her dominance over the drama.

V&A

1 week agogorgonettafashionsfromhistory 235 notes
+